Eighteen Brumrio

Wefford also mentions the inversion, done for Marx, of the dialticahegeliana. While Hegel assumed that the real life, concrete, it is defined to apartir of the conscience and the ideas created for the man, Marx> is the material conditions (; ‘ estrutura’ ‘) that they define the plan of the ideologies, the ideas, the values (superstructure). This because the classroom that to make use dosmeios of material production is the same classroom that makes use of the ways of produointelectual, in way that the dominant ideas express the materiaisdominantes conditions. However, if it does not have to understand this point by means of a leituradeterminista, so expensive to ‘ ‘ marxism vulgar’ ‘ that it understands that the ideas someramente reflected of the material conditions. It must be understood, as Weffordtem the care to place, that ‘ ‘ the fight of classrooms is in such a way a fight in the planomaterial how much in the plan of idias’ ‘ 7. This because at propitious moments of crisis and to the revolution, the classroom dominanteperde the monopoly of the intellectual production. The next boarded point for the commentator says respect to the State and atransio for the socialism.

For Marx, the laboring classroom is not enough to take to destroy the proper machine state. However, odesaparecimento of the State alone is possible after the period of ' ' dictatorship of proletariado' ' , characterized for the taking, on the part of the State, of all the instruments deproduo of the hand of the bourgeoisie. This would be the way for the abolition of classese of the State. Wefford shows as this formularization also appears in the Eighteen Brumrio de Luiz Bonaparte and in OCapital. To the end of the commentary, Wefford comes back to the subject of the present time of the revolution.

How to think, nowadays, a revolution in marxist terms? Weffordaponta for the necessity of if thinking a new conception for the fight for the universal emancipaohumana and, attempting against for the fact of that exactly the workmanship of Marx must today serlida with more critical eyes, considering the historical moment of suaformulao and in the transformations that had occurred until then. If the problems are osmesmos, them if they redimensionaram. Finda the reading of the text of Wefford, the reader has much in what to think. Much more that to limit itself perhaps dosmais elaborated of the Collection well not only for that they are initiating seusestudos in Marx, but also for that already they are made familiar to suaobra. 1 WEFFORD, Francisco. Marx: politics and revolution. In: WEFFORD, F. (org) ColeoClssicos of the Politics, volume II, 2002, P. 228 2 Idem, ibidem, P. 231 3 Op.Cit.p. 232 4 Op. Cit. p. 233 5 Op. Cit. p. 234 6 Op. CIt.p. 238 7 Op. Cit. p. 241>

Tags:

{ Comments are closed! }